30in30: Put a Pin in it

A friend of mine recently said she loves Pinterest because it makes her feel creative. Mind you, she is not talking about all the cool, creative projects she makes after cruising the site, rather, the act of pinning interesting and creative “someday” projects makes her feel creative. I know how she feels. I created a “30in30” pinboard and have to admit, the mere act of pinning made me feel more positive about my weight loss efforts.

Here is a link to my board for your own inspiration. Pin away!

 

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Karen Propp is an artsy-fartsy digital geek who sees beauty in a different way. She chronicles the pursuit of happiness and  her weight loss project, 30lbs in 30 weeks, in a weekly feature. You can read the introduction here and follow her journey here. You can also follow Karen on twitter @karen_propp.

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30in30 Week 2: Beat It!

Week 2 of 30lbs in 30 weeks. | +2lbs

It is week 2 of my 30lbs in 30 weeks project and I gained 2lbs. Clearly, not off to the best start. I would love to blame it on my sprained ankle, but I doubt that had a dramatic effect. This s a very good time to exercise rule #3 – Don’t beat yourself up.

This past week, I focused on music. I find that music can completely transform my mood. Walking down the street with headphones on, I want to dance, skip and jump and often find that my pace quickens to match the beat. Oddly enough, Lifehacker came out with an article this week about the positive effects of music on your mood and energy level. Music can improve memory, boost your immune system, enhance exercise, keep stress at bay, and increase productivity.

To kick the week off, I finally broke down and bought a nice set of over-the-ear headphones (I hate those earbuds that most people wear). The moment I put them on, I wondered why it had taken me so long to make the purchase. I love them. I wear them to clean house, walking anywhere and while working at my desk.

Next, I set about creating playlists. For workouts, this included songs that are between 120-140 beats per minute. There is a great New York Times article that goes into great detail about the perfect exercise music. There are some great tools that will analyze the music in your library and select the ones that meet your criteria. iTunes has a field where you can enter the bpm and sort songs accordingly. There are also sites like JogTunes and DJ BPM Studio that have done some of the work for you.

What are your favorite songs to walk, run, and play to? Do you have an exercise playlist? Post your suggestions in the comments below and follow @beautyskew on Twitter where I will be posting my Spotify playlists.

To learn more about my project, 30lbs in 30 weeks, follow my weekly posts here.

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Karen Propp is an artsy-fartsy digital geek who sees beauty in a different way. She chronicles the pursuit of happiness and  her weight loss project, 30lbs in 30 weeks, in a weekly feature. You can read the introduction here and follow her journey here. You can also follow Karen on twitter @karen_propp.

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When Will Hair Bias Ever End?!

In an apparent attempt to appeal to women, the Wall Street Journal published an article on the many ways we seek to straighten our frizzy locks.  Why is this a WSJ-worthy piece?  Well, we business women, especially those handling financial matters, must be seen as tidy and put together.
Now wait a second.  Does anyone have a problem with this?
Who decided that curly hair is “ungroomed”? Even the title of the article, “The Taming of the Curl,” pissed me off.  The implication, of course, is that curly hair (ah, dare I say ethnic hair?) is untamed, wild and crazy.
For the sake of argument, let’s say you buy into this theory, i.e., straight hair equals solidity and conservatism.  I can kinda understand wanting to see my financial advisor with a straightened do.  After all, I’m as cautious about my money as the next gal, so of course I want to know that whoever’s handling it dots their i’s and crosses their t’s.
But at the same time, I want to know that this person is always thinking ahead and has creative solutions to my needs.  If straight hair represents solidity and conservatism, then shouldn’t curly hair represent innovative thinking and new ideas?  So, in the end, isn’t curly hair as or more desirable?
The thousands of dollars we spend a year on our hair is evidence of how critical our do’s are to our self-confidence and work lives.  No question, hair matters.  But why must certain styles communicate professionalism and competency?  As women living in an ethnically diverse, open-minded culture, shouldn’t we be passed these old-fashioned judgments?