More to Love: Additions to the Reading List


Came across some great beauty-in-culture reading this week.  Have a read:

  • Beauty is serious business, especially where science is concerned

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/from-cancer-to-wrinkles-beauty-care-lures-biotechs/9622d

  • So many actresses are focused on for their beauty or love lives.  But most of them are hard-working mothers who serve as role models on the screen and in real life.  Why can’t we start focusing on that side of actresses more? Here’s one good example: Sharon Leal

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/myrdith-leon-mccormack/sharon-leal-1982-actress_b_2418831.html 

  • Bobbi Brown comes out with another book.  But this time it focuses on the power of women and how make-up can help fuel that

http://www.freep.com/article/20130107/FEATURES01/301130009/New-beauty-books-Bobbi-Brown-Andrew-Jacono?odyssey=nav%7Chead.

  • Tech equipment companies go…beauty?  Yep, check out the latest from Panasonic

http://www.dailymarkets.com/stock/2013/01/07/panasonic-further-enhances-compact-beauty-series/

Any more stories to add? Comment or tweet us @Beautyskew

Beauty Brands Can Have Actual Campaign Ideas, Not Just Pretty Pics

There’s no question the aesthetic aspect of beauty communications is vital.  After all, beauty brands are selling beauty so their packaging, digital communications and advertising better be beautiful too.

But I’m often challenged with the question whether beauty brands need to have a deeper story to tell too.  Of course the visual elements tell a story.  They can project premium-ness, certain styles (e.g., bohemian vs preppy), the age group of the user, and the attitude of the brand (e.g., straightforward vs subtle or aloof).

But a beauty brands can stand for something too.

Beauty is powerful and so the brands that offer it have important roles to play in people’s lives.

Some brands are very overt about their roles, like Bobbi Brown with its “Pretty Powerful campaign.” And now Bare Escentuals has its “Force of Beauty” story too.  Bare Escentuals wants to tell the world that life doesn’t stop at being pretty; one has to be a person of action too.  And being a change agent is really what moves someone from being just pretty to being beautiful.

The print ads state: “Pretty is not enough.  Pretty is nice.  It’s fine.  Pretty can turn heads, but beauty.  Beauty can change the whole world.  Pretty is what you are, but beauty is what you do with it.  Pretty can lift spirit.  Beauty makes them soar.  So smile.  Be bold.  Show your beauty.  When you put pretty into action, there’s no limit to what you can do.  Be a Force of Beauty.”

For its campaign, the brand didn’t just recruit the typical teenage beauties.  Instead it sought women who represented the values of the brand, i.e., being both beautiful on the outside and forces of change too.

You can call it hokey but it least the brand recognized the deeper value and role of beauty, and took it’s story to the next level.

Comment or tweet me your thoughts @beautyskew

 

Bobbi Brown and I Think Alike

Last year I commended Bobbi Brown on her Pretty Powerful campaign (When Fashion and Beauty Brands Reflect Their True Role).  I expressed my admiration for her understanding the true role of beauty in our lives.  It, among other things, gives us the confidence to be creative, seduce your man, or kick some ass in the business world.

A year later I have to reference her again, as I whole-heartedly agree with her philosophy.  In a post entitled: Being Pretty Powerful is Much Bigger Than Beauty, she writes: “All women are pretty, and the key to bringing out their beauty is confidence.  While makeup shouldn’t be considered a prescription for self-confidence (that has to come from within and be developed over time), I believe that with the right tools and knowledge, makeup can help all women achieve that little ‘boost’ to help look and feel their best … instead of fighting the body you have, accept it and make the most out of it.  Focus on being healthy, strong and fit.  Commit to making smart food choices and exercise regularly.  This requires work and it’s not a quick fix, but you’ll look and feel better over the long-term.”

When I first launched Beautyskew, my mother asked, “Not everyone is beautiful, you know.”  I answered, “Maybe some think they aren’t beautiful, but everybody has beauty within them and with the right tools that can be seen on the outside too.”

It’s great to know others, like Bobbi Brown, agree!

Comment or tweet me your thoughts @beautyskew